Notes


Note    H1426         Index
.

NOTES:
Christina Ann Spalding is referred to as Ann Ffrench in the last w ill
of her father Basil Spalding (1176). The will, which was probated on
November 15, 1828, gave her and her two sons, John and Ambrose Ffrenc h,
the two tracts called "Berrys Amendment" and "Hopewell." Representat ives
who presented the will for probate include D'Arey A. Ffrench (who ma y have
been her spouse), and Christiana F. Ffrench.


Notes


Note    H1427         Index
.

NOTES:
Married 1st Eleanor Alvey 29 Jan 1811, 2nd Maria Ford 26 Jul 1814.


Notes


Note    H1428         Index
.

NOTES:
See THOMAS JENKINS OF MARYLAND 1670 by Edward Felix Jenkins O.S.A. , pg 64:
"Clement, C., born May 7, 1814; died July 26, 1857. He was an attorne y."


Notes


Note    H1429         Index
.
NOTES:
Last Will dated 28 Oct 1774 was probated Dec 5, 1774. It is found
in the records of St. Mary's County, Liber TA #1, Folio 688, Annapoli s.
He made gifts to his wife, Ann, and his four children, Winifred, Mary,
Teresa, and Ann Spalding. Executors: Ann and Joseph Dant. Witnesses:
Clement Power, William More and Edmond Power.
The final account was filed 25 Dec., 1774. Appraisors Edward Matt ingly
and James Price reported L85-. Creditors were Philip Key and Zachar y Bond.
Nearest Kin - Dorothy Thompson and Thomas Spalding. On 14th day of A pril
1775 came Ann Spalding and made oath etc. Liber 121, Folio 396, Anna polis.


Notes


Note    H1430         Index
.

NOTES:
Per Peg Oman: b. ca 1777 d. ca 1823, m. Mary C. Radford 27 Dec 18 13.
His tombstone at St. Joseph's (old) Cemetary, St. Mary's Co., MD. sho ws:
EDWARD SPALDING
Died Feb 28 1823
Age 46 years


Notes


Note    H1431         Index
.

NOTES:
See THE SPALDING FAMILY OF MARYLAND, KENTUCKY AND GEORGIA by Hughes
Spalding, FHL 929.273Sp18sg at pps 251-255:
"Edward Spalding, who in the judgment of the writer is undoubtedly
the father of Mother Catherine, was one of the sons of Basil Spalding.
There is no record of the exact date of his birth. However, he marri ed
in October 1789, so he was probably born in the late 1760's. (pg 251)
"Edward Spalding was one of the seven sons of Basil and Catherine
Spalding. He married Juliette Boarman in Prince George County, Mary-
land on October 8, 1779. He and his wife resided in Charles County,
Maryland, and the census of 1790 shows that he owned six slaves and
that he had three females (probably bondwomen). The census record
does not show that he owned any land, although he was undoubtedly the
head of a household.
"When his father Basil Spalding died on September 26, 1791, he
(Basil) devised his home farm known as "Green's Inheritance" to his
three youngest sons, Basil Jr., Edward and George Hillary. In 1795
the three brothers divided the land and on October 7, 1797, Edward
sold his part consisting of 111 1/2 acres to his brothers Basil and
George (Hillary).
"Not long thereafter, in the year 1798, Edward and his family em-
igrated to Kentucky and settled at Cox's Creek, one of the Catholic
settlements.
"The tax list for 1799 for Nelson County, Kentucky, shows that
Edward owned four slaves and four horses. As far as the tax list
shows, he owed no land. Not long after the Edward Spalding family
settled at Cox's Creek, Juliette Spalding, wife of Edward, died, prob-
ably during the latter part of 1798.
"On December 7, 1799, Edward took as his second wife Sarah Housley.
The marriage was performed by the Rev. S. T. Badin, who was the first
Catholic priest ordained in the United States. (Father Badin was poss-
ibly the greatest missionary of the west....[He donated the land to a nd
is a co-founder of Notre Dame University].
"On August 8, 1800, Edward purchased from Major James Cox three hu n-
dred acres of land on the Salt River in Bullitt County, Kentucky. Th is
county bordered on Nelson County to the northwest.
"In September of 1801, Edward was appointed constable for Nelson C o-unty. He was apparently making an attempt to accumulate a fortun e in
a short length of time and probably was speculating in land. In any
event, whatever lines of endeavor he was following soon led to his
financial downfall. In March 1802 he borrowed L353 from his brother-
in-law Robert Housley, and as security fo the debt he gave Housley a
mortgage on all of his property, both real and personal. One of the
conditions of the mortgage was that should this debt be unpaid at the
end of one year, Edward would forfeit all of the property covered b y the
mortgage. About this time, in 1802, he became indebted to Hayden Ed-
wards in the amount of L120, and induced his brother-in-law Thomas
Elder, who married his sister Elizabeth, and who also resided at Cox's
Creek, to guarantee the payment of this debt.
"When Edward's debt secured by a mortgage to his brother-in-law
Housley became due, it was unpaid and Edward was unable to pay it.
Housley brought suit against him in 1804 and attempted to gain posses s-
ion of the property covered by the mortgage. Housley secured a judgm ent
against Edward Spalding in 1806, but apparently there was a contest of
some kind and Housley was not granted possession of the mortgaged pro perty
until 1808. Edward Spalding died soon after, either in the summer or
fall of 1808.
"During the period of this litigation, Edward found himself unabl e to
pay his debt of L120 to Hayden Edwards and, in 1805, Thomas Elder was
compelled to pay off this debt. As a result of this, Mr. Elder was
unable to pay other debts and was sent to debtor's prison in 1807. We
know this to be a fact because Father Badin, the missionary priest at
Cox's Creek, wrote a letter to Bishop Caroll of Baltimore at the en d of
1807 in which he stated: "I find that Thomas Elder had been in jail f or
debt and is totally ruined and incapable of paying one cent of the de bt
contracted by his sale of tickets in the Catholic Church lottery."
This imprisonment of Thomas Elder took place a year or longer befor e the
death of Edward Spalding, and at a time when it is claimed by some th at
Catherine Spalding and her sister Ann were wards of Thomas Elder and
living in his comfortable home.
"As far as the records go, Edward Spalding was a man of mystery.
His name disappeared from the tax list in 1803 and in March 1805 it w as
adjudged by the court that he was no longer an inhabitant of the Comm on-
wealth. At the same time, however, he was represented by counsel in a
suit brought against him in Nelson County. Apparently Edward was con-
stantly engaged in litigation and was unable to pay his debts and pro b-
ably it was in his own best interests at that time to leave the state.
There was a turmoil of litigation involving him and his two brothers- in-
law, Thomas Elder and Robert Housley and other individuals, which wa s in
progress in Nelson County, Kentucky, from 1804 until 1808. There i s no
record of how Edward's second wife and his five children fared during
this period, and it is no improbable that they took refuge at the home
of Elizabeth Spalding Elder, who resided at the same settlement. Mrs.
Elder, of course, was the wife of Thomas Elder, but it is difficult to
understand how the Elders were able during this period to own and mai n-
tain a home, when Thomas Elder was totally ruined financially and tot ally
incapable of paying his debts."